Thursday, January 14, 2010

Hand-Me-Down Recipes—Hard Waffles

In my grandmother’s family, which was Norwegian, one of the specialty foods that was often served at afternoon coffee gatherings was what was known as "Hard Waffles" (as opposed to what was called "soft waffles" shown in my previous post).

These Hard Waffles were served cold, with a generous layer of butter spread on them. They would be eaten first, with cookies, shortbread, fruitcake and homemade chocolates to follow.



Here is my challenge to you: I have been unable to locate a recipe quite like this one. Does anyone know of it, perhaps under a different name? Does anyone out there have a tradition that includes Hard Waffles as a specialty treat?

This recipe is in my maternal grandmother’s handwriting:

 
Recipe

Makes 4 dozen 2-inch by 2-inch rounds

2 cups sour milk (cream is better) {I used 2 cups cream + 2 tablespoons lemon juice)
½ cup butter
3 eggs
1 cup white sugar
1 teaspoon soda
2 teaspoons baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
Flour to roll {I added 6½ cups}

Roll and bake in heated waffle iron.

Tasting Notes
Not too sweet, these waffles are rich and filling, a perfect snack with a hot cup of full-bodied coffee. Next time, I'll try adding cardamom to spice it up.

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  • 41 comments:

    Julie @ Willow Bird Baking said...

    I bet the Brass Sisters, who collect heirloom recipes, would love to see your hand-me-down recipes!! These look great!

    Allie said...

    This looks delicious! I haven't quite come across a recipe like this but I've tried such hard waffles at the one of the stores here.

    Super tempted to try this! Which means I'll really need to get a hot waffle iron >.<

    Sarah, Maison Cupcake said...

    I love the look of both of these types of waffle but the shape of the hard ones is the prettiest. It's marvellous you have inherited these handwritten recipes, how lovely.

    natalia said...

    Ciao Shari ! In Italy we have ferratelle they are thinner and eaten plain I'll look for the recipe !

    forsvinnendesaus said...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waffles google "Scandinavian waffles", you'll probably find something. I have never heard these being called "hard waffels" - makes me wonder what you do with them! I'm a Norwegian, lived here all my life. They are supposed to be thin and soft, maybe you get a difference using what is technically know as a "belgian iron". Try to get hold of a Scandinavian one!

    Michele said...

    I've seen these before and I've always thought that they looked delicious. Thanks for sharing!

    A Year on the Grill said...

    they look and sound beautiful... they need to hire a press agent, so that they get a better name

    Dawn said...

    seriously I must try this. love these, never tried them but I can tell I will love them.

    Anonymous said...

    Wow! These could sell as mini beaver tails to skaters on the Rideau Canal! Delightful!

    Carolyn Jung said...

    Wow, so it's made with an almost dense cookie-like dough? I've never tasted such a waffle. They look awesome!

    Vegard said...

    Hi!
    My grandmother used to make these, but since she became sick I haven't seen them around at family gatherings. Not anywhere else either for that matter. I think it's a dying treat in Norway, sadly. I will try to get a hold of my grandmothers recipe at some point.

    Kara said...

    They serve these at one of my favorite places, D Bar Desserts. When they come off the waffle iron, they sandwich homemade vanilla bean ice cream, and a cherry chutney. The hard waffle texture is much like a waffle cone, but the warm temperature makes for the perfect texture with the cold ice cream. Theirs also has a hint of cinnamon. Mmmmmm!!

    Jules Someone said...

    So excited to make these! I am loving cardamom these days. Yum!

    Lynda said...

    What a great post. I love your pictures and the copy of the recipe in your Grandmother's handwriting. I am going to make some tomorrow!

    jessbcuz said...

    I love the old recipe cards. I have a few copies of some recipes from my great grandmothers and they are such a link to my heritage.
    I haven't heard of these, but they sound interesting. Good luck on finding out more about them.

    Eliana said...

    I've never heard of hard waffle but they sound delicious.

    Julie said...

    Wow, love the recipe card! It looks exactly like my grandmother's recipes - the writing is almost identical! I miss hand-written recipes! Thanks for sharing.

    Avanika [YumsiliciousBakes] said...

    These sound intriguing. Hope that with all the comments, you've been able to figure out what they are called! I'm loving the waffle thing going on in all the blogs, since I recently acquired a waffle iron :) That's what they call TIMING!

    Erika from The Pastry Chef At Home said...

    I've never heard of hard waffles before (learning new things for 2010!) I love old hand written recipes -I recently found a bunch in my mother in law's collection from the 1940s! I can't wait to try these!

    Manggy said...

    Haven't encountered these specifically, but they look like Belgian Waffles (though they are probably not). Going to give it a good think-- good on you for keeping tradition alive!

    Anonymous said...

    I didn't hear the term, hard waffles, in Norway. I do know that they usually serve their waffles cold and spread with jam or brown cheese. Heart shaped waffles are the norm. My daughter-in-law even made them at a volleyball tournament and they were a popular snack. I looked in my "Norwegian Cooking" book which noted that you should place the finished waffles on a rack to keep them crisp. Do you think they mean "crisp" waffles? They serve pancakes the same way, cold and folded in half with jam or cheese. Even on the ferries, "svelle" were a popular snack - basically a cold pancake, thinner than ours and folded in half with a filling in between. Coffee shops also featured them.

    Caroline@BudgetMEals said...

    Super cute... I love these! What a cute idea- I might have to try this!

    The Food Librarian said...

    These look beautiful and delicious. I love handwritten recipe cards! I think we need to start writing them down so we aren't handing down a zipdrive full of computer files! :) - mary the food librarian

    Malak said...

    I made these the other night. Took your advice and added cardamom. Also baked them on a waffle iron with smaller indentations which worked well. We loved them! Thanks!

    Cooking With Dia said...

    I love your blog Shari. I'm so glad I bumped into it tonight. Fantastic waffles, haven't had any in a long time, but will have to try some soon!

    Carol Peterman said...

    Very interesting. I've never heard of hard waffles, but they look like something I would like!

    Global Potluck said...

    Thank you for sharing your food history. These recipes are a part of so many memories and stories. We need to share them so that we don't lose them.

    SouthAsiaRocks said...

    I just got back from Thailand and they sell these on the streets. If you google "Thai Waffles" you'll find waffles a lot like these. In Thailand they make them sweet, or almond or with things inside sometimes too. Yummy! Thanks for sharing your recipe!

    Lynda said...

    I made this with my mom on Sunday. We were watching the Golden Globes and we had the waffle iron on the coffee table in the living room and we were cooking them as we watched. I put them out at breakfast today and my son tried one and he said, "This is a God's breakfast!" He loved them and so do I.

    Aksel said...

    Actually, in Norway, they're called "tørre vafler" (dry waffles). My grandmother makes them at times. But I haven't seen anyone else make it.

    Sophie said...

    Lovely hard waffles, Shari!!

    I also have a recipe from my husband's grand mother, because we are belgians & this recipe is also a true winner in our extended family!!

    You can find it @my foodblog under breakfast or dessert! They are called Granny's waffles!

    Anna said...

    I adore using recipes from my grandmother and mother as well...it means so much. My first time on your blog and I love it--looks great!

    afoodobsession said...

    will definitely try this...i love old family recipes , the picture of the original recipe index card is awesome.

    RecipeGirl said...

    What a treasure that handwritten recipe card is! I'd love to have some cards like that from my grandmothers but I'm afraid they were the type that cooked from their heads.

    I love these little treats. Added cardamom is a terrific idea! Or maybe give them a roll in cinnamon-sugar before popping into the waffle iron.

    shayma said...

    Shari, wishing you a happy new year. i love that you are sharing your grandmum's recipe with us. that's so beautiful. and this would be lovely with some tea. x shayma

    Sandy said...

    Looks very delicious. Waffle's are always very taste. This sounds a different recipe. i would this

    Anonymous said...

    If she's Norwegian why is the recipe written in English?

    Anonymous said...

    Scandinavian waffles are traditionally made in a thin waffle iron that makes heart shaped waffles. Those thick waffle irons are definitely Belgian or American.

    Bestemor in Brooklyn said...

    Have been making Torre Vafler or Dry Waffles for years. My Mom's recipe calls for vanilla, not cardamom. These are a completely different thing than the ordinary Norwegian waffles we all know and love. I roll them out to fit the waffle iron.Dough needs to be chilled to enable this, and extra flour on the board helps. Never saw them small before. Most Norwegians know English!

    Gine said...

    Tørre vafler is so awesome, have to find my recipe and share with you, mine calls for cardamom and vanilla sugar

    Zoha Toor said...

    Absolutely yumm!