Saturday, January 23, 2010

Krum Kake

The third in this series of waffle posts (see previous posts on Best Waffles and Hard Waffles) is Krum Kake. Pronounced "KROOM kah kah", this is a favorite Norwegian treat. The word "Krum" means "bent" and "Kake" means "cake" so Krum Kake is a "bent cake". Baked on a type of waffle iron, the Krum Kake is coiled around a wooden cone as soon as it comes off the iron. As it cools, it becomes crisp and can be slipped off the cone.



Krum Kake irons come with various decorative designs, producing a fanciful, artistic imprint on each cookie. The delicate, rolled cones make a beautiful addition to any dessert table.

Eaten on its own, Krum Kake is like a rich, crisp cookie. With a bit of whipped cream added to the cone just before serving, they become even more decadent. And we have been known to add our own homemade ice cream to the cone, making a delicious finish to any meal.

To make this special delicacy, you will need a Krum Kake iron and a wooden cone roller.


The Krum Kake shown in these photos were made by wonderful family friends.
(Thanks, Thelma and Kassandra . . . and Don!)
Recipe

Makes 2 dozen
1/2 cup butter, softened to room temperature
1/2 cup white sugar
3 eggs
1/2 cup flour
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground cardamom
6 tablespoon water

Cream butter and sugar together. Add eggs, one at a time, stirring after each. Add flour and vanilla and mix until smooth. Add cardamom (other flavorings such as 1/2 teaspoon lemon zest or 1/2 teaspoon almond extract may be substituted for the cardamom). Sir in flour, mixing well. Add water until the batter flows off the spoon like a thick cream sauce.

Heat Krum Kake iron. Spoon some batter on the iron and cook until golden brown. Remove from heat and roll around a wooden cone immediately. Slip off cone and allow to cool.

Store in an air tight container in a cool, dry place.


Tasting Notes
These are known to be addictive. The mild, gently rich taste of the crispy cone is delicious on its own, but even better as a holder for whipped cream or ice cream.

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  • 18 comments:

    pigpigscorner said...

    I love the mould! Reminds me of love letters.

    Sarah, Maison Cupcake said...

    Those look so pretty, I have some of the cone supports that my grandmother left me but no waffle iron and no dea where to get one!

    Hilary said...

    These look like they would make the most awesome ice cream cones ever!

    Anna said...

    These are so lovely and special. They're beautiful!

    A Year on the Grill said...

    very pretty... and so small and delicate looking

    Tracey said...

    Gorgeous! My mother-in-law makes these at Christmas every year and they're one of my favorite treats :)

    Manggy said...

    That is a beautiful iron... A true heirloom! (And of course, the resulting krum kakes are fantastic.)

    cantbelieveweate said...

    I've never had these, but was sort of introduced to them when I was 11...just never got to eat one! What fun!

    Lori said...

    So pretty! Ice cream would be the perfect addition and I can definitely see how one just wouldn't be enough. Yum!

    lisa said...

    Now, I want to make these as ice cream cones! They look so great.

    Anonymous said...

    The information here is great. I will invite my friends here.

    Thanks

    Michele said...

    I thought about making these before, but have never attempted it. Yours look do delicious and perfect!

    All Recipes said...

    I love your waffle maker :)

    ev.

    TeaLady said...

    What fun!!

    Sophie said...

    These look grand & lovely!! i also love your waffle maker,...

    Runnergirl said...

    I`m Norwegian and my mum and I make these every year for Christmas! BTW; the correct spelling is "krumkake"; in one word:-)

    yjiean said...

    Thats some pretty antique you have there. We have those in Asia too, and we call them love letters. I don't know why though.

    Jenn said...

    oh yum. my grandmother used to make these every year around the holidays!